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Simmons SD2400 !?!?!.
#1
Shocked 
The SD1200 is a really nice kit for it's price point and if you are in that (price point) market you should really check it out.

With that said, I want to see Simmons compete on a higher level. They have demonstrated that they are able to push their designs and some innovation (Color display & Bluetooth wireless midi). But, if I'm being honest the SD1200 is what the SD2000 should have been. Don't get wrong, I think the SD1200 has a lot of life in it.

The price point I'm thinking about is the $2,500.00 mark. Alesis is a big player in this market with the Strike Pro Pro SE. I really think this is the sweet spot for higher end edrums. Yes I know there are kits much more expensive and I'm sure many would love to see a super high end Simmons kit but, I believe that the $2,500.00 kit should be the goal. It's a price point that's achievable to many without pricing themselves out of the market.
I know with topics like this people tend to want to ask for everything under the sun and yet somehow be the end all to be all but, that's now what I'm trying to layout here (no pie in the sky). I'm trying to layout a reasonable idea for a $2,500.00 kit.
The easiest way to start is to look at the competition. What do those kits offer? Now if you stop there your not going to get very far. You really need to go just beyond that. Here's why, as a consumer I need a reason to buy Simmons over the competition and being very similar to that competition isn't going to drive people to buy a new product, unless your price is significantly less. That's going to be tough considering Simmons would need to undercut a known under-cutter. So don't try to undercut the competition that way. Instead go just beyond with capabilities. Not only does this give you something different than the competition but, it also helps future proof your product a little more. They already do this with the SD1200 (i.e. Color display, ios app & wireless Bluetooth).

What the kit might look like:
- Tom pads: (2) 10 inch, (2) 12 inch (4) total all dual zone.
- Snare pad: 14 inch 3 zone.

The reason for 3 zone is to have all three states of a snare drum. How to go about the third zone doesn't need to be difficult, heck even an interpreted (similar to Roland) would work.

- Cymbal pads: (2) 14 inch crash 2 zone w/choke, (1) 14 inch China 3 zone w/choke, (1) 16 inch ride 3 zone w/choke, (1) 10 inch splash 2 zone w/choke

Yes I know a 3 zone China is an very odd request However, it serves a few purposes. First it's China shaped and no one else has this standard. Second, it can double as a second 3 zone ride cymbal just shaped like a China. It's about flexibility of the edrum kit. Players have no problem with the rim of a drum pad being something like a cow bell or blocks. An extra 3 zone cymbal can be special effect cymbals, bells, chimes, stacks etc. It's about being innovative in a way that is likely to be successful since it is a familiar shape.

- Kick pad: 1

At this point a full size looking bass drum is a required. I would suggest that bass drum trigger have two jack on it. One for the cable that goes to the module and the other used as an expansion jack (could be color coded). If you decide you would like a double bass set-up, you would just plug the second bass trigger into the first. This eliminates a cable going to the module and the bass drum trigger input on the module itself would be set up as a standard piezo/piezo dual zone input. (This same trick could easily be implemented on the other drum trigger as well. It's not hard to incorporate).

These are just my thoughts as of right now and as time goes on I will most likely add/modify this post.

I haven't even touched on the module yet...
My Home Page: www.Hellfiredrums.com
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